Autotransfusion Clinical Priorities

John Ingram

Autotransfusion Clinical Priorities

Fellow Colleagues: 

My name is John Ingram CCP and I am presently pursuing my Master's Degree in Perfusion at the University of Nebraska Medical Center.  Myself along with three of my fellow classmates are researching clinical aspects of autotransfusion and would greatly appreciate your input on the following question: 

Premise:

Some of the most important aspects of utilizing an autotransfusion device include a number of key clinical considerations.  These clinical considerations are: 

  • a high end-product hematocrit, 2) the user friendliness, or ease of use of the device 3) the effectiveness of the washing process regarding its net removal of the many undesirable and harmful entities, 4) the net volume of the end-product, (i.e. the volume size of the bowl) and 5) the amount of time it takes to produce the end-product, (i.e. the speed of the process). 

Question:  

If you were charged with the responsibility of selecting the optimal centrifugal based autotransfusion device for use at your institution, what clinical qualities of the device would be the highest priority in making your selection?  Please rate in order of priority 1 to 5, with 1 being your highest clinical priority 

_____      Ease of Use 

_____      Speed of Processing, (minimal amount of time)

_____      End Product Hematocrit

_____      Bowl Volume

_____      Washing Process Effectiveness (Net Removal of Undesirable Entities)

Timothy Sean Hunsinger, CCP-LP

RE: Autotransfusion Clinical Priorities
(in response to John Ingram)

Here you go, John:

 

1 @ Washing Process Effectiveness (Net Removal of Undesirable Entities)

2 @ End Product Hematocrit

3 @ Bowl Volume

4 @ Speed of Processing, (minimal amount of time)

5 @ Ease of Use

 

Tim Hunsinger | Arkansas Children's

John Ingram

Autotransfusion Clinical Priorities
(in response to Timothy Sean Hunsinger, CCP-LP)
Thanks Tim for all your help!

On Sun, Mar 28, 2021 at 2:02 PM Timothy Sean Hunsinger, CCP-LP <
[login to unmask email]> wrote:

> Here you go, John:
>
>
>
> 1 @ Washing Process Effectiveness (Net Removal of Undesirable Entities)
>
> 2 @ End Product Hematocrit
>
> 3 @ Bowl Volume
>
> 4 @ Speed of Processing, (minimal amount of time)
>
> 5 @ Ease of Use
>
>
>
> Tim Hunsinger | Arkansas Children's
>
> -----End Original Message-----
>

Amber Lickert, BS, CCP, LP

RE: Autotransfusion Clinical Priorities
(in response to John Ingram)

This reply is on behalf of Yawen Zhang.

 

Hello perfusion world,

 

My name is Yawen Zhang. Here are my thoughts on the discussion on autotransfusion.

 

Question 1: If you were charged with the responsibility of selecting the optimal centrifugal based autotransfusion device for use at your institution, what clinical qualities of the device would be the highest priority in making your selection? Please rate in order of priority 1 to 5, with 1 being your highest clinical priority

__5___ Ease of Use

__3___ Speed of Processing, (minimal amount of time)

__2___ End Product Hematocrit

__4___ Bowl Volume

__1___ Washing Process Effectiveness (Net Removal of Undesirable Entities)

 

Question 2: Please comment as to the reasoning for your selected clinical priorities.

Accroding to Serrick C. et al. (2003), the various cellsaver devices on the market varies in their ability to wash away undesirable byproducts & their ability to concentrate washed RBC. The waste to be removed by cellsavers include platelet, leukocytes, potassium, heparin, and plasma-free hemoglobin. Additional measures of quality of washed RBC aside from hematocrit include RBC mass recovery and the rate of recovery. Given this knowledge that cellsaver devices on the market produce washed RBC product of different quality, I place the “washing process effectiveness” and “end product hematocrit” as my top priorities in selecting a cellsaver device.

 

Serrick, C.J., Scholz, M, Melo, A., Singh, O. & Noel, D. (2003). Quality of red blood cells using autotransfusion devices: a comparative analysis. The Journal of the American Society of Extra-Corporeal Technology.

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